Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Graphene and Semiconductors .

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Vijay K. Arora

Wilkes University, USA

Keynote: Graphene Nanoelectronics

Time : 09:30-10:15

Graphene 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vijay K. Arora photo
Biography:

Professor Arora obtained his Ph. D. from the University of Colorado, U. S. A. In addition to his tenured appointment at Wilkes University, he is privileged to have held the distinguished visiting appointments at the University of Tokyo, National University of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, University of Western Australia, and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM). He was chair of NanoSingapore2006, NanotechMalaysia2010, and EscienceNano2012 conferences. He is listed in a number of Who’s Who biographies.  Professor Arora has been invited to give keynote papers/lectures/courses at international forums, spanning from nanotechnology to nanoeducation to nanomanagement, both on and off a chip. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and many uncounted publications in conference proceedings. Professor Arora’s most recent recorded forum (30 minutes) on Educating Global Engineers can be downloaded from his webpage http://web.wilkes.edu/vijay.arora/  by clicking on the Faculty Forum 2013. 

Abstract:

The Rising Era of Graphene began with the award of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2010 jointly to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional (2D) material with a honeybee lattice (Figure 1). Graphene can exist as 0D as fullerene, 1D as CNT, and 3D with multilayers. The experiments based on graphene have shown alternative material structures like phosphorene and silicene with expandable bandgap that is required for semiconductor devices. Its allotropes can form sensors as chemical elements react with the dangling bonds on the surface, thereby registering the presence of a chemical by enhanced transport properties. This review will first present the cohesive bandstructure as unique boundary conditions are applied to rolled-over graphene into CNT and small-width GNR, transforming 2D to 1D nanostructures. The transformed density of states and both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium distribution function define the carrier statistics and transformations of randomly oriented velocity vectors to streamlined ones in extreme nonequilibrium. Nonequilibrium Arora’s Distribution Function (NEADF) is shown to possess distinct properties that are considerably different from Monte Carlo procedures and Nonequilibrium Green’s function. The exceptional feature arising from the application of NEADF is the scattering-independence in the saturation region while ohmic mobility is strongly scattering-dependent. Moreover, it brings out vividly the velocity saturation as arising from the intrinsic velocity with a limiting value of the Graphene’s Fermi velocity  that is higher than the Fermi velocity in semiconductors.  Ballistic transport where device length is smaller than the scattering-limited mean free path is shown to degrade the mobility.  Resistance quantum is obtained in 1D configuration that is generalized to give contact resistance and channel resistance. Magnetotransport in graphene is discussed to demonstrate the utilization of magnetic field in characterization and performance evaluation.

Keynote Forum

Kuan-Tsae Huang

AzTrong , Taiwan

Keynote: Graphene Battery – Impact on Electrical Vehicles and Grid Storage

Time : 10:15-11:00

Graphene 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kuan-Tsae Huang photo
Biography:

Kuan-Tsae Huang is the CEO of AzTrong. He has extensive experience in commercializing technology in mass production, supercapacitor and sensors/IoT for a wide range of industrial applications. He was a Vice President of IBM and worked at IBM Watson Research center and several start-ups, including SingaLab in Singapore, Nanotune in Mountain View, and AzTrong in Taiwan. He was on the faculty of number of universities in US, Singapore and Taiwan, and President of National Taiwan Normal University. He was selected by LAUNCH as one of the 2011 top 10 Energy Innovators, which is organized by Department of State, NASA, USAID and NIKE. Currently, his focus is on graphene battery ranging from wearable/IoT devices to EV and Grid energy storage to Smart Life solution and services. Dr. Huang received his PhD in EECS from MIT and MS in Applied Math from Illinois-Urbana Champaign and BS from National Taiwan Normal University.

 

Abstract:

We expect the graphene batteries will be the market leader for energy storage market in 2020. With the emergence of smart mobile devices (MD), electric vehicles (EV), and grid and distributed energy (G&DE) the world is moving rapidly toward a more connected and more sustainable place. Recent merge between Tesla and Solar City is an example. All these advances hinge upon the development of next generation of energy storage technologies that can deliver high energy and power densities at a low cost (i.e. $150/kWh) and high safety. Graphene has emerged as important candidates for electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to their unique physical properties. A review on the current state-of-the-art and most recent advances in graphene-containing nanocomposite electrodes and their derivatives will be provided along with the synthetic routes of their electrochemical performance in LIBs will be discussed. More importantly, the limitations of graphene related materials for energy storage applications will be highlighted, with an emphasis on anode and cathode materials. Several directions for near future R&D will be discussed. AzTrong is a leading production equipment supplier of high quality functional GO/rGO (ink, powder, slurry, film) for various applications & solutions. Dr. Huang will share his experiences in graphene battery, graphene mass production as well as commercialization for energy storage and other applications.  

  • Applications of Graphene in energy

Session Introduction

Jong-Sung Yu

Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea

Title: Elastic Nano-Graphene-functionalized silicon anode for lithium ion battery with superior cycle stability and rate capability
Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Jong-Sung Yu earned a B.Sc. in Chemistry from Sogang University in Seoul, Korea and a Ph.D. from the University of Houston in 1990 before postdoctoral work at Ohio State University. He was a professor in Korea University during 2008-2015 before he moved to DGIST. Currently, he is a supervisor for graduate students of Light, Salts and Water Research Lab and a chairperson at Energy Systems Engineering Department of DGIST, where his research focuses on nanostructured materials, including nanoscale 0-3D materials and their composites, and their energy applications for fuel cells, batteries, super-capacitors, sensors, and photocatalytic systems

Abstract:

Silicon (Si), one of the most promising anode materials for next generation high-performance Li-ion batteries (LIB),is popularly studied recently because of its super high lithium capacity (4200 mAh g-1). However, Si has a dramatic volume change (~300%) during charge-discharge cycling, leading to severe capacity decay and poor cycle stability originating from its structural collapse. Carbon or graphene-modified Si is an effective method to improve its performance. Traditional three models of carbon or graphene/Si-based core-shell, yolk-shell and physical wrapping have been reported recently. However, they are still insufficient in structure to solve the silicon issues. In our work, a new concept multifunctional nano-graphene shell is elaborately designed for silicon by a low-temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method on a hierarchical nickel nano-template (see Figure 1). The as-synthesized nano-graphene-functionalized silicon ([email protected]) composite shows unique functions to challenge the current silicon anode issues in LIB. The new functional nano-graphene shell gives the full consideration of Si issues such as Si conductivity, Si volume expansion, and mass transfer, which not only can supplement poor conductivity of Si, but also self-adaptively change their space to accommodate the lithiated Si with inflated volume by their elastic feature. More importantly, different with traditional large graphene flakes, the graphene sheets in nano size has less ions barrier effect to guarantee easy Li+ and electrolyte paths. In addition, the graphene layer provides excellent protection for SEI film to guarantee high cycle stability.As an anode electrode for LIB, the [email protected] composite exhibits excellent cycling performance with high reversible specific capacity (2330 mAh g−1 at 250 mA g-1 with an initial CE of 83.4%, and 1385 mAh g−1 at 500 mA g−1 after 510 cycles with a CE of 99.2%). A superior 95% capacity retention is achieved after 510 cycles. More notably, remarkable cycling performances were obtained over harsh testing conditions of high current density and high [email protected] loading, where the [email protected] still shows several times higher capacities than commercial graphite after 1000 cycles. All the electrochemical performances get benefits from the well-designed functional graphene shells. This work demonstrates a new direction towards the development of high efficient Si anode with high capacity and super cycle stability.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammed Khenfouch, a 34 years old nano materials scientist and professional Physicist, originally from the North African country of Morocco, holds a PhD in Physics (nanoscience and anaotechnology). Mohammed has gained some 8 years of in-depth knowledge and experience in the multi-disciplinary field of nanosciences and nanotechnology, with a specific focus on photonics, optics, optoelectronics and smart nanomaterials including Graphene materials. Mohammed has produced several peer reviewed outcomes. Being involved in numerous international organizations, Mohammed is an active member of African Network as well as The American association for science and technology (AASCIT), Unesco-Unisa Africa Chair in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (U2ACN2) and The Arab Scientific Community Organization (ARSCO). In addition, Mohammed served as adjudicator for many prestigious International programs and reviewed for many prestigious publishing groups. Moreover, he participated in the organization of many big events and the most recent one was NanoAfrica2016. Currently, Mohammed is the founder-chairman of Africa Graphene Center.

Abstract:

Carbon-based nanomaterials are well known for their innumerable applications in all fields of science and technology. One of the most incredible carbon-based nanomaterial’s in recent years is graphene, due to its amazing properties.Owning to its unique physical and chemical properties, this material is set to revolutionize the 21st century for its wide practical uses, such as, Nano electronics, sensors, capacitors, solar cells, fuel cells, Li ion batteries, photo catalysis, electro catalysis, drug delivery and plasmonics.Since graphene was isolated by mechanical exfoliation in 2004, many promising properties have been reported, such as extremely high electron mobility. Furthermore, graphene’s strong interactions with photons and electrons, and chemical functionalization ability could add more functions to photoactive composites.Their optical properties can be easily modulated via many processes, treatments and/or interaction with other compounds.In this sense, the rise of graphene and its based materials in photonics and optoelectronics is shown by several recent results, ranging from solar cells and light-emitting devices to touch screens, photodetectors and ultrafast lasers.This work is reporting on the photonic and optoelectronic properties of graphene materials including discussions on the interaction between the different compounds based on the study of a couple . Hence, graphene materials are suitable for many optical and optoelectronic applications including organic solar cells donor-acceptor systems.

Speaker
Biography:

Ibrahim Ismail got his PhD from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1999.  Since then, he carried on his research work on different materials for energy and environment application in Tokyo Institute of Technology, Institute of Research and Innovation, Cairo University and Zewail City for Science and Technology. He published more than 70 articles, one book chapter and submitted one patent.  Moreover, he participated as consultant in more than 40 projects in Africa and Middle East.

Abstract:

Owing to the rapidly increasing demand for energy conversion devices, energy storage platforms have become significantly attractive more than any instance in the past. Indeed, supercapacitors are considered one of the most promising energy storage devices, due to their excellent reversibility, rapid charge/discharge, high power density, in addition to long-life and cyclic stability compared to the analogous electrochemical energy storage devices. Typically, supercapacitors can be classified into two basic categories, pseudocapacitors, and electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC). On the other hand, graphene-based materials are given much consideration as effective electrode materials owing to their high specific surface area, excellent chemical stability, electrical and mechanical properties, and the feasibility for large-scale production of chemically-modified graphene (CMGs). To this end, the Hummers’ method is widely used to produce graphene oxides (GO). Herein, the electrochemical performances of MnZnFe2O4/RGO colloidal nanoneedle-based supercapacitor is investigated. Cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge and cycle stability have been investigated. The obtained results reveal that, the MnZnFe2O4/RGO colloidal nanorods have a superior specific capacitance higher than MnZnFe2O4. The MnZnFe2O4/RGO based- supercapacitor using H2SO4 electrolyte demonstrated the best cycle stability among all the supercapacitor

Basma EL Zein

University of Business and Technology (UBT), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Title: Laser induced graphene as Electrode for 3rd Generation Solar Cells
Speaker
Biography:

Basma El Zein, PhD. Dean of Scientific Research, at UBT. She has 18 years of experience in academic and research institution. She was a Research Scientist at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), and an associate researcher at IEMN, Lille, France.  Dr.El Zein is a SMIEEE, member of ACS, MRS, SPIE, and ECS. She has been selected as winner of Albert Nelson Life Achievement Award by Marquis Who’s Who 2017 and Solar Pioneer by MESIA in 2015. Her research interests include working on nanostructures for third generation eco-green solar cells, energy harvesting and energy storage. She is exploring new materials perovskite to be used as light absorber for Solid state sensitized solar cells. She is a reviewer in many international, peer-reviewed journals, the chair or co-chair and on the committee of different international conferences; she published in many international journals and had one patent.  

Abstract:

Graphene has recently emerged as an alternative to ITO substrate as an electrode in solar cells structure. With its remarkable electrical, physical and chemical properties, and high degree of flexibility and transparency; it is considered as an ideal candidate for flexible 3rd generation solar cells, the graphene solar cells an eco- green technology is getting to the same level of ITO based solar cells.Laser Induced Graphene (LIG) method has been used and characterized on flexible substrate for flexible quantum dots sensitized solar cells.The Flexible quantum dots sensitized solar cells is composed of LIG as Electrode and and active layer combining a Metal oxide layer for electron collection and quantum dots layer for Light absorption and carrier Generation.In this presentation, the role of LIG graphene in Flexible solar cells will be presented.  

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Johann Bouclé is currently Associate Professor at the XLIM Research Institute (CNRS UMR 7252 / University of Limoges, France), where he manages a research axis devoted to hybrid optoelectronic devices based on organic and inorganic semiconductors. After a PhD in Physics obtained in 2004, he was appointed postdoctoral research associate at Imperial College London with Prof Jenny Nelson and then at the University of Cambridge with Prof Neil Greenham, to develop novel hybrid solar cells based on polymers and metal oxide nanostructures. He is currently involved in the scientific boards of various French bodies in the field of printed electronics and solar cells. He is member of the International advisory board of the African Graphene Center, and currently contribute to the development of graphene-based materials for photovoltaic applications, and mainly perovskite solar cells.

Abstract:

Graphene materials, including pristine graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide, are largely explored for their outstanding electronic and optical properties, making them relevant component of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells. In this context, various solar technologies have incorporated graphene-based component (active layer, transparent or non-transparent electrodes, charge extraction layers, etc), leading in many cases to improved power conversion efficiencies with regard to traditional materials. These developments have been rapidly transposed to highly efficient perovskite devices , which are now considered as a realistic alternative to thin film technologies, considering their easy processing from solution and the relatively high performance achieved over the last few years.In this work, we propose an original approach for the development of graphene oxide/TiO2 composites, synthesized in a single-step by laser pyrolysis, to be used as electron-extracting layer in perovskite solar cells. This method, which was successfully employed in the field of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell incorporating TiO2/carbon nanotube composites, is based on the direct integration of a graphene suspension in the precursor mixture used for the production of anatase TiO2 particle, using an infrared laser and an aerosol precursor mixture in a cross-flow and wall-less reactor.In this work, we will present the physical properties of TiO2 / graphene composites by focusing on the electronic interactions between the TiO2 particles and graphene sheets using photoluminescence spectroscopy and Raman diffusion. We will also discuss the possibility to improve the charge transfer processes between the two components through the initial degree of reduction of the graphene used and the experimental conditions. Finally, we will evaluate the potentialities of the composites to demonstrate efficient selective contacts for perovskite solar cells. 

  • Graphene modification and functionalization
Speaker
Biography:

Y. W. Park was involved in the original discovery of conducting polymers in 1977 under the guidance of Prof. Alan J. Heeger who received the Nobel Chemistry Prize in 2000 with this achievement together with Prof. Alan G. MacDiarmid and Prof. Hideki Shirakawa. Park has made unique contributions on the synthesis and transport studies of carbon based nanostructures such as conducting polymer nanofibers, carbon nanotube, organic conductors, molecular conductors and graphene. He has also contributed significantly to the transport and mechanism studies of highly correlated materials, such as high Tc superconductors. In particular, his recent discovery of "Zero magneto resistance in polymer nanofibers" is his most important and seminal achievement. In particular, the CNT based nonvolatile MEMS memory has achieved a 1000 times faster switching speed, applicable to the MP3s, smart phones and cameras with very low power consumption and possible multinary bit devices

Abstract:

The effect of hydrogen adsorption on twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) is studied. Raman spectroscopy and the electrical transport properties (electrical resistance and thermoelectric power) confirm the electron doping by hydrogen adsorption, in agreement with the previous report involving exfoliated bilayer Graphene (BLG). Common electron doping behavior were observed at various twist angles (0o, 5o, 12.5o, and 30o), and the adsorptions follow the first–order Langmuir-type adsorption model. Specifically, we analyze the off-state currents, with band-gap openings of around 13 meV in tBLG with twist angle of 0o, as in Bernal-stacked BLG.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sagade is a researcher in the Electrical Engineering Division of Department of Engineering at University of Cambridge. He is also associated with EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics focusing on the designing of novel electronic devices to be printed on flexible sheets and exploring the possibilities for high speed testing of large-area electronics produced by reel-to-reel (r2r) manufacturing. He has Ph. D. in Physics from Dr B. A. M. University, Maharashtra, India. Also he has worked at JNCASR Bangalore (DST Nano fellowship) and AMO GmbH Germany (part of Flagship Graphene Project). He has co-authored more than 35 peer-reviewed publications and 3 US patent applications. Dr. Sagade has developed graphene device encapsulation process which assist in persisting its novel properties in ambient for several months with negligible hysteresis in DC measurements which enables real life applications usage of graphene. Dr. Sagade is a member of AAAS and MRS-Singapore.

 

Abstract:

As many graphene-based electronic and optoelectronic device concepts begin to make the transition from the research laboratory into real world applications it is imperative that factors such as long term stability and large area reproducibility are addressed. Graphene is inherently highly sensitive to environmental factors such as ambient air, lithography resists and polymers used in the transfer process which cause unintentional, generally p-type, doping and hysteretic behavior in field effect devices. Many of the graphene field devices need ambipolarity. To overcome these issues device encapsulation and passivation is required.  Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of oxides provide two-fold benefits. Firstly, Al2O3 act as a moisture barrier which add long term stability and protection of devices from humidity and other atmospheric effects. Secondly, the ALD process has been shown to effectively passivate charge trap sites such as silanol (SiOH-) groups at the SiO2—graphene interface which are responsible for much of the observed unintentional doping and hysteretic device behavior. We have developed two different routes to enhance the nucleation of ALD oxides on hydrophobic graphene surface. In first approach an ex-situ nucleation layer of 2 nm Al film was deposited with appropriate amount of oxygen control by e-beam evaporation. While in second route an in-situ nucleation was created by pulsing water precursor in the ALD chamber. In both the methods highly-air stable and reproducible GFETs are obtained. We have shown continuous hundreds of DC measurements in ambient which do not show any hysteresis and shifts of Dirac points with negligible doping concentration in graphene channel. It paves the way to speed up the production of graphene devices for real life applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Shaojuan Li is a lecturer at Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, China. She received her Ph.D. degree (2013) from Peking University (China) in Microelectronics and Solid Electronics prior to joining in FUNSOM in 2013. Dr. Li has engaged in research of semiconductor based optoelectronic devices for more than 9 years. She has acquired multidisciplinary expertise in materials science, photonics, and nanotechnology. Over the past 3 years, she has published over 20 peer-reviewed journal articles, including ACS Nano, Advanced Functional Materials, Small, Nanoscale, Advanced Optical Materials, Advanced Electronic Materials, Photonics Research, New Carbon Materials, etc. Her research interests include transistors and optical sensors based on two-dimensional materials.

Abstract:

Graphene has recently emerged as a potential candidate to address the shortcomings of traditional IV and III-V semiconductors for fast and broadband photodetectors. Graphene photodetectors can convert light into electrical signal over a broad electromagnetic spectrum from ultraviolet (UV) to terahertz (THz) range. However, the intrinsic optical responsivity of pure graphene-based transistors is usually poor (~10-2 AW-1) due to its relatively low absorption cross-section, fast recombination rate and the absence of gain mechanism. This has led to the formation of heterostructures of graphene with other gain materials that have a band gap, owing to the enhanced device performance in terms of photoresponsivity and photoconductive gain in these hybrid structures. Here, we reported novel photodetectors based on graphene-Bi2Te3, graphene-MoTe2, and graphene-black phosphorus heterostructures and their application for broadband photodetectors. Our results show that the graphene-Bi2Te3 photodetector not only shows greatly enhanced responsivity (up to 35 AW-1 at 532 nm) and an ultra-high photoconductive gain (up to 83), but also has the capability for broadband photodetection from visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. We also demonstrated that graphene-MoTe2 heterostructure photodetector achieves a high responsivity of ~970.82 AW-1 (at 1064 nm) and broadband photodetection (visible-1064 nm). Additionally, flexible devices based on the graphene-MoTe2 heterostructure also retains a good photodetection ability after thousands of times bending test (1.2% tensile strain), with a high responsivity of ~ 60 AW-1 at 1064 nm. Finally, we show that the graphene-black phosphorus heterostructure photodetector shows an ultrahigh responsivity of 3.3×103 AW-1, high photoconductive gain (1.13×109), ultrafast charge transfer (41 fs), polarization dependent photocurrent response, and long term stability at telecommunication band of 1550 nm wavelength. The high performance in NIR range demonstrated in this work paves the way for practical applications in remote sensing, biological imaging and environmental monitoring using 2D material

Speaker
Biography:

Zahra Sadeghian is associate professor of materials science and engineering. She has been received PhD from TU Clausal (germany) in 2005. She has been spent postdoctoral fellowship in chemical engineering (membrane process) at RWTH Aachen University in 2010. She is working at research Institute of petroleum Industry (RIPI) from 2005. Her expertise in nanostructured coatings for surface modification and nanomaterial synthesis such as carbon nanotube and graphene and their composites. Also she has been investigated on ceramic composites in adsorbent, biomaterials, catalysts and membranes applications. She has experiences on oilfield produced wastewater treatment and desalination pilot plant using ceramic membranes and their composites. Also she has been fabricated ceramic membranes for separation of hydrogen from syngas and other gases.

Abstract:

 

The largest wastewater stream is generated in oil and gas industries. In order to meet environmental regulations as well as reuse and recycling of produced water, treating oily produced water is very important. In this research has been worked on nanofiltration (NF) membranes with functionalized graphene oxide (F-GO) for wastewater treatment.In this work, the synthesized GO from our previous work (Fig. 1a) was first functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI). The PEI–GO thin film constructed on home-made microporous -alumina/alumina substrate to enhance and improve the characteristics of nanofiltration (NF) alumina membranes. Fig. 1b shows microstructure of ceramic membrane surface modified PEI-functionalized GO representing of compressed thin layers. The interactions between PEI–GO and the alumina matrix are caused to make passageways for water rapidly passing through membrane. Also the contact angle and zeta potential results showed a notable increase in surface hydrophilicity of the thin layers accompanying presence of positively charged PEI. The filtration properties of the membrane were tested by home-made cross flow NF using oily wastewater with oil concentration of feed 5000 mg/L. High oil (>99%) and total organic carbon (TOC) rejection(>99%)  was obtained using the prepared membrane. Also the water flux was almost 10 times higher than that of the pristine alumina membrane. The permeation flux-decline is decreased to an ultralow level (less than 1%) that it turns to the antifouling layers on modified membrane surface. The superior antifouling property is mainly focused on surface structure of the membrane such as superhydrophilic character and charge of the modified alumina surface.As a result, the PEI–GO/alumina hybrid membrane showed an effective method for preparing composite NF membranes with effective reinforced permeation and superior antifouling property that it improves the performance of the oil separation and wastewater treatment.