Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Graphene and Semiconductors .

Submit your Abstract
or e-mail to

[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

Day 2 :

Graphene 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jae-Jin Shim photo
Biography:

Jae-Jin Shim received his BS degree from Seoul National University in 1980, MS degree from KAIST in 1982, PhD degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1990. He has been a professor in Yeungnam University since 1994 and served as School Chairman and Vice-Dean of Engineering. He served as the President of the Korean Society of Clean Technology and Vice President of the Korean Society of Engineering Education. He is the Directors of the Institute of Clean Technology and the Clean Energy Priority Research Center. He has published more than 140 papers in reputed journals and served as the Chief Editor of “Clean Technology”. His current research interests are synthesis and applications of graphene(or carbon nanotube)-based nanomaterials for supercapacitors, catalysts, and sensors; syntheses of polymers and organic materials using supercritical fluids and ionic liquids; living polymerization in supercritical fluids and ionic liquids; and clean technology.

Abstract:

Nanomaterials of metal oxides and conducting polymers have been developed for energy storage (supercapacitor), sensor, and photocatalyst applications. They have shown good electrochemical performances but are not satisfactory. Various materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes have studied to enhance the electrochemical properties owing to their large surface area and high electrical conductivity. Synergistic effects of excellent conductivities of graphene and high electrical properties of metal oxides or polymers have improved the overall electrochemical performances tremendously.In this study, graphene (natural or synthesized), graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, highly reduced graphene oxide have been tested for improving performances as a supercapacitor, sensor, and photocatalyst. Other methods have also been used such as doping of graphene with nitrogen or sulfur, using metal sulfides instead of metal oxides, and using highly porous materials as substrates. In the synthesis of these materials, a cleaner technology has been employed.

  • Graphene synthesis

Session Introduction

Irina V. Antonova

Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Russia

Title: Graphene / fluorinated graphene systems for a wide spectrum of applications
Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Dr Irina V. Antonova graduated from the Novosibirsk State Technical University (Department of Physics and Engineering)in 1979. Since 1981 she has been working in the Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science. Presently, I.V. Antonova occupies a leading researcher position in the institute of Semiconductor Physics and heads a group of researchers which deals with investigation of graphene and its derivatives. Her activity was connected with transport and recharging phenomena in nanocomposite layers (Si, Ge nanocrystals in dielectric matrix), and localized states in heterostructures (SOI, quantum wells and quantum dots), high-pressure-related effects, surface passivation phenomena. The scope of current research I.V. Antonova include chemical functionalization of graphene, fabrication of graphene-based heterostructures and arrays of graphene quantum dots embedded in a fluorographene matrix, transport and recharging phenomena in nanocomposite layers. Nowadays, Prof. Dr Irina V. Antonova has above 240 papers.

Abstract:

In the report we consider the properties of partially fluorinated graphene (FG) created with the use of a simple fluorination method based on the treatment in an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid. FG films can be formed from CVD grown graphene and a graphene suspension. A possibility to control a size of graphene flakes in a suspension in the course of their fluorination was also demonstrated. The possibility to create the FG films with arrays of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) is revealed. The spectrum of quantum confinement levels for GQDs in a fluorinated matrix and a charge relaxation time from GQDs are determined with the use of charge transient deep level spectroscopy. The time of GQD recharging can be controlled by means of GQD thickness variation or daylight assistance. This finding makes films with GQDs promising for flash memory applications. Fluorination of domain boundaries leads to a strong current modulation by gate voltage with an ON/OFF relation ~ 105 (the property important for field effect transistors).The negative differential resistance (NDR) and a step-like increase in the current are found for films created from the fluorinated graphene suspension. The NDR resulting from the formation of a potential barrier system in the film is observed for a relatively low fluorination degree. The observation of NDR in FG films widens the range of possible applications. A stable resistive switching effect is detected in films created from the FG suspension. The origin of resistive switching was found to connect with the appearance of traps with energy 0.08 eV and the recharging time lower than 700 ns. The charges in metal–insulator–semiconductor structures with FG dielectric layer have been estimated as the ultra low values of (0.5–2)x1010cm-2.Suspensions of fluorinated graphene with nanometer size flakes are of interest for the development of 2D ink-jet printing technologies and the production of thermally and chemically stable dielectric films for nanoelectronics on rigid and flexible substrates.

Speaker
Biography:

Pradip Majumdar is the chair and professor emeritus of mechanical engineering; and the director of heat and mass transfer laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northern Illinois University (NIU), where he has been teaching and conducting research over thirty-two years. His research interests and experiences are in Thermo-fluid Sciences; Multi-Physics Simulation Modeling, Design and Data Analysis; Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Heat Transfer CFD, Finite Element Methods; Fuel Cell Power Generation System, Li-Ion Battery Storage systems; Electronics Cooling; Thermal Interface Materials using Nanomaterials; High Energy Laser Material Processing and Additive Manufacturing; Blood flow in human arteries, stent design and drug delivery system;  Energy-human tissue interactions. and IOT System design and development. He has published two text books: 1. Computational Heat and Mass Transfer and 2. Fuel Cell: Analysis and Design.  He is an elected Fellow of ASME.                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Abstract:

Polymer composites with a high thermal conductivity are always desired for different applications. Improved thermal conductivity of polymers can be obtained via dispersion of metal particles in a polymer matrix, however a good dispersion and thermal coupling `cannot be achieved. We have designed and developed a formulation with enhanced thermal conductivity of silicone and epoxy-based resin systems using graphene and boron nitride-based nanomaterials synthesized in our laboratories. The nanocomposites are characterized thoroughly and excellent thermal conductivity improvement was observed. A detailed data analysis with different characterization techniques will be discussed and demonstrated.

  • Large scale Graphene production and characterization
Speaker
Biography:

Professor Piotr Kula Ph.D., D.Sc. President of Polish Materials Society, a member of European Materials Science Society (FEMS) and American Society for Metals (ASM). He has been the Head of Materials Science and Engineering Institute at Lodz University of Technology since 1997. Since them, he has founded and developed a strong research team in the field of surface engineering and nanotechnology, recognized as the “Lodz School”. His main scientific and research achievements are none steady state models of vacuum carburizing and vacuum nitriding, artificial intelligence based software that supports these processes on the industrial scale and recently the manufacturing technology of High Strength Metallurgical Graphene (HSMG) as well as the concept of using HSMG to produce the graphene-based nanocomposite for reversible storage of hydrogen.

Abstract:

Effective practical application of products made of graphene as the base material are contingent on the development of methods of manufacturing large-area graphene on an industrial scale, the structure and properties of which would be similar to theoretical ones. At the Lodz University of Technology, an original industrial method was developed of producing large-area sheets of graphene through its controlled growth from metallic liquid phase . Graphene produced this way is close to structural perfection, i.e. it is single-layered and quasimonocrystalline, which results in its very high cohesion confirmed in static and cyclic tests of tensile strength. The authors of the 2D material produced in this manner called it "High Strength Metallurgical Graphene" – HSMG®. Also disclosed were two alternative growth mechanisms of graphene from the liquid metallic phase, i.e. dendritic and cellular, which produce HSMG with different electrical properties – respectively conductive graphene (c-HSMG), and semiconductive graphene (sc-HSMG) . The capabilities of HSMG® were indicated with respect to selective adsorption and chemisorption of gases - in particular hydrogen - from gas mixtures .With the described mechanical and physical properties, high strength metallurgical graphene is ideal for application as the reinforcing phase and at the same time functionally active phase in laminates. HSMG can be repeatedly transferred between different substrates; this offers prospects of supervised control over the distance between successive reinforcement layers in the polymer matrix. A separate area of potential application of HSMG® is sensing of gases and electromagnetic radiation.The success of graphene as an engineering material of the future depends on the creative creation of new generation devices, rather than on strenuous attempts we have seen so far to replace other components with graphene in pre-existing design solutions and technologies.

  • carbon nanotubes and graphene

Session Introduction

Gilbert chachine

ESRF - The European Synchrotron BM02 - D2am France

Title: Suspended graphene and nanoscrolls explored by nanofocused xrays
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Gilbert Chahine is a research-engineer at the CNRS working on the BM02 beamline at the European Synchrotron (ESRF) in Grenoble France. After a PhD in materials science with the highest distinction degree at the CEA in France, Gilbert developed during his postdoc a new x-ray imaging technique (KMap) along with a user-friendly software for the analysis of 5D data sets. This technique is now highly requested by a large community of researchers form international institutes to perform new types of experiments such as in situ and operando strain imaging, with the highest available resolution, of nanodevices for photonics, photovoltaics and optoelectronics. Besides coordinating several projects involving international academic and industrial institutions in the field of strained semiconductors, Gilbert became also interested in adapting the latest advances in synchrotron x-ray sources for a direct model-free in-depth probe of 2D materials’ local structure for a better understanding of their properties.

Abstract:

Structure determination of crystal lattice parameters and orientation with high precision is rather straightforward for bulk 3D-materials. X-ray diffraction proved especially powerful in this respect across the years. On the contrary, structural determination of 2D crystals with the help of x-rays is more demanding. So far, exploiting interferences between a crystalline substrate and graphene, it was possible to accurately determine the lattice parameter of graphene, averaged across the ~1cm2 surface of a sample[1,2]. Such studies are however restricted to graphene samples of macroscopically uniform crystalline orientation. However most graphene samples of relevance for potential applications (micro-electronics, telecom, displays) exhibit inhomogeneities, as they are composed of single-crystal grains (~10µm), each having different crystalline orientation and strain. Finely characterizing such structural features requires to probe suspended graphene with the help of nano-shaped beams.Using, instead of electron beams, nanofocused X-rays, we managed to conduct simultaneously Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) characterizations with high resolution in reciprocal space and an unprecedented resolution of 200nm in real space, Accordingly we were able to map the structural variations in two- dimensions, revealing in this way strain maps for the suspended few-layer graphene membrane and the morphological features at the edges of the flakes, where it forms scrolls with a typical length of the order of 10µm and a diameter of the order of 10nm.  The orientation of the nanoscrollls could for instance be resolved.Our complementary analysis with spatially-resolved Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to unambiguously determine the Grüneisen parameters of graphene, linking the deformation to the energy of its vibration modes, without any particular assumption.These experiments pave the way to advanced in-situ experiments and for exploring 2D crystals and their phase transitionsusing synchrotron radiation especially with the future upgrade programs in the European Synchrotron for outstanding expected brilliance.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Srivastava did his master and Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from IIT(BHU), Varanasi, India. Also, did post Doc from University of Bath, UK (under European Fellowship); QMW, London (under Commonwealth Fellowship); and MPA, University of Stuttgart, Germany (under BMBF Fellowship). He has involved for the development of ceramic composites, polymer composites and Nano composites. He has published more than 155 papers in peer reviewed international              journals. He has collaborated various international projects with UK, USA, Germany, Australia, Japan, South Korea, Italy, Czech Republic, Poland and France. He is FOUNDER PRESIDENT of “ICRACM SERIES” international conference. He is Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Industrial Science & Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract:

A Carbon Nano material such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Graphene Nano platelets (GnPs) has attracted considerable interest over recent years due to its intrinsic mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Incorporation of small quantity of Nano fillers into polymer can create novel Nano composites with improved structural and functional properties. The properties of polymers, as reflected by their response to externally applied stresses, are dependent on both time and temperature. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of polymer-based MWCNT/epoxy resin and GnP/epoxy resin Nano composites provides important insight into the intimate conformation of the polymer chains in the sample, as well as the interactions of these chains with MWCNT and GnP components in the composite system.Therefore, dynamic mechanical and Nano hardness measurements of MWCNT/epoxy resin and GnP/epoxy resin Nano composite were used to evaluate the effect of temperature on dynamic elastic modulus. These provide direct information on various other characteristic structural parameters, such as dynamic viscoelastic behaviour, glass transition temperature (Tg), storage and loss moduli, and tan δ. The results of these measurements for all samples were compared, and allowed the evaluation of the effect of a magnetic field on the MWCNT/epoxy resin and GnP/epoxy resin Nano composites. It can be seen that the storage modulus decreased with the increase of temperature, whereas loss modulus increased with increase of temperature. At low temperatures all the samples show a very high value of the storage elastic modulus, followed by gradual drops due to second order transactions between 400C to 1100C. The principal drop, due to the glass transaction, is evident for all samples in the range 1300C to 1400C. But, tanδ curves show a peak value 1500C to1600C of temperature range indication glass transaction temperature. This indicates that the addition of Nano filler improves the elastic properties of the epoxy system at elevated temperatures in the rubbery region. The loss modulus indicates that the energy has been converted into heat and can thus be used as a measurement of viscous component or unrecoverable oscillation energy dissipated per cycle. It may be further concluded that the Nano hardness increases with increase of elastic modulus. 

  • Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Semiconductors and Perovskites
  • Semiconductors

Session Introduction

Ping Tang

Sichuan University , China

Title: Study on AlSb thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition
Speaker
Biography:

Ping Tang has her expertise in preparation and characterization of compound semiconductors and photovoltaic devices. Her research interest focuses on the study of novel compound semiconductors and related solar cells. At present, she is working on the fabrication of AlSb thin films and AlSb/ZnS based solar cells. She has succeeded in preparing AlSb thin film materials and fabricating AlSb based solar cells with an architecture of TCO/ZnS/AlSb/Au and an open-circuit voltage of over 30 mV has been achieved. 

Abstract:

AlSb is a kind of potential absorber material for thin film solar cells. In this paper, AlSb thin films were prepared by using pulsed laser deposition method, and the effects of substrate temperature on the properties of AlSb thin films were studied. XRD results showed that the average grain size of AlSb films increased with the increase of substrate temperature. AFM images suggested that the surface morphology of crystal AlSb thin films was continuous, homogeneous with high compactness. The electrical measurements showed that the AlSb films were semiconductors with the conductivity activation energy of 0.08, 0.17 and 0.01 eV. At the optimized temperature of 380 ℃, the optical band gap of AlSb thin film was 1.52 eV. The obvious photovoltaic effect has been observed in TCO/ZnS/AlSb/Au device, which demonstrated that AlSb is a potential absorber for thin film solar cells. In present work, high quality AlSb thin films were prepared by using PLD method and the AlSb thin films we prepared were used in solar cells. The effects of substrate temperature on the properties of AlSb thin films were studied. High substrate temperature is helpful for the grain growth of AlSb films. The crystal growth was enhanced and the average grain size became larger with the increase of substrate temperature. The surface morphology of crystal AlSb thin films is continuous, homogeneous with high compactness. The electrical measurement exhibits that AlSb thin films prepared by PLD method are semiconductors with conductivity activation energy of 0.08, 0.17and 0.01eV. The optical band gap of AlSb thin film is 1.52 eV at the optimized substrate temperature of 380 ℃. Over 30 mV open circuit voltage is obtained in the TCO/ZnS/AlSb/Au device.